Tag Archives: sherlock holmes

Writers are liars

Let me be specific. While non-fiction writers and journalists sometimes make errors in research, get their facts wrong, or shade their story to suit their bias, overt or otherwise, I am talking fiction writers. They are all liars.

Their is no Huckleberry Finn or Tom Sawyer. No Sherlock Holmes or James Bond. There was no Ahab chasing a whale (didn’t he have something better to do?) and there is no Count Dracula with a neck fetish. All lies. None of it is true.

Jane Austen lied to you, as did Mark Twain, and yes even contemporary writers like Thomas Pynchon, Gillian Flynn, Roberto Bolano, Umberto Eco, Paula Hawkins, and every other writer in the entire history of literature. Al liars.

So why do we read these insidious devils who have trampled on one of the ten commandments? I think lying is one, but I’m not sure, I don’t pay attention to most of the commandments; but if it isn’t a commandment it should be. And while we are at it, there is nothing wrong with looking at my neighbors wife. Touching is out, but looking should be okay.

We read these liars, to get back to the point, because in reading these lies we see truth. For within the lies are emotional truths we recognize as our own; the experience we see that happens with the characters we recognize as our experience, even if the action is crazy. We might not be astronauts, but the feelings they have, the experience they have we can identify with. We can empathize.

Unlike Ahab, I will not chase a whale. I get seasick. But I understand his motivation; I know why he goes on the insane hunt. I will not venture to Dracula’s castle (yes there is one) for I have heard rumors about him and know to stay away from people who avoid the sun. I also know to use garlic and carry a cross. This is what happens when you believe the lie. It becomes real, you see.

So if you want to be a writer who wants to tell the truth of the world, then start writing lies. We all do. And it works.

My lies at Amazon

 

 

 

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A book lovers dream house

room with viewA book lover by nature wants a house with a view and especially a view of water. Here we have a nice corner nook with a wooden floor (book lovers don’t go in for plush shag carpeting) with a tasteful rug, and a comfortable chair with armrests. And of course you notice two shelf bookcases filled with books. In the middle of the picture between those two cushions is an area for cheese and crackers and a glass of wine. Or, if you are like me, a dozen maple bars.

This area is one in which you read the classics. It is perfect for Homer’s Odyssey, The Last Days of Socrates by Plato, Paradise Lost, but nothing of Thoreau. You take Thoreau when you go camping.

Having immersed yourself in the classics during the week, you can read cozy mysteries here on weekends.

 

 

 

home libraryTo the right you is a picture you see a wonderful library guarded by your dog-he comes with the house-and you notice his front legs are ready to spring into action as a true guard dog would do in protecting your library. On the other hand he could be thinking you are bringing him a treat. And look at the most comfy chair to snuggle up with a book and the small side table for more wine-Riesling, for this room, red for the corner nook above. A must have spiral staircase and a ladder for checking out all the great references books like The Oxford History of the Classical World, or The Complete Sherlock Holmes, or perhaps John Fowles, but not Harold Robbins or Jackie Collins.

And I am sure you notice the window facing the armchair. If you don’t like the view you can place a High-definition TV there in order to watch Masterpiece Theatre, then read Thackeray, Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Kurt Vonnegut.

 

 

closet book nookAnd here we have a wonderful Nook. This can be your office. I think the room is too feminine and the horse and rider must go along with the wallpaper. This room is a fixer-upper.

But it has great potential with perhaps the most comfortable place to read in the house. It is also a place where you are more liable to fall asleep so you want more light reading here. Or books you don’t want any visitors to know that you read. You know who I mean, Harold Robbins-but Tom Robbins is perfect; not Jackie Collins, but Willkie Collins is okay.

It is also a cozy place to settle in with your significant other and read erotica together. If no ‘other’ is available, this is a good spot for your cat to settle onto your lap and purr as you read the play script of Cats. And you can serenade your pet with songs from the play.

I suggest doing that last bit when no company is in the house, otherwise you are likely to end up in therapy.

 

Here we have a unique chair. The cushion looks comfy, but your elbows may have to rest on the tops of books as they are taller than the chairs side. I recommend paperbacks on the top so that problem is eliminated. The type of books are cop thrillers, suspense, horror-Dean Koontz and Stephen King-and fast summer types of reads.

book chair

 

 

 

 

 

And now to bed.

 

bookbed

 

My website

My Amazon bookshelf

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How Sherlock Holmes changed the world

It may come as a surprise to some, but Sherlock Holmes changed the world of police investigations and forensic science. While his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was having Holmes examine crime scenes and setting up a lab at his 221 B address on Baker Street, police at the time had no clue (pun intended) about crime scenes and forensic science was 23 years away. For readers at the time the Sherlock Holmes stories must have seemed like science fiction. But science fiction would become reality.

Dr. Edmond Locard of Lyon France was called “The Sherlock Holmes of France” because he was a pioneer in forensic science. He convinced the police to give him two rooms in the attic with two assistants and began the first police lab in 1910. He continued to work until his death in 1966. Locard was a fan of the Holmes stories and used Holmes methods and deductive reasons in his work.

Another fan of Sherlock Holmes was an Austrian judge named Hans Gross who wrote the first book on police procedure and criminalistics in 1893 that is so thorough it is considered the classic textbook on crime scene investigation. Gross was fed up with how police conducted solving crimes; nobody gathered evidence from crime scenes because no one thought to do so. Much of how Gross approached his work can be traced to how Holmes conducted himself at crime scenes.  

Doyle based the character of Sherlock Holmes on one of his professors who expounded deductive reasoning. The professor James Bell even wore a cap similar to Holmes.

So we have James Bell, a professor who inspired Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to study deductive reasoning and Doyle used the methods of deduction with his character Sherlock Holmes whose crime solving methods were unheard of at the time, but inspired two men to create forensic science and change police investigations in ways that changed the world we live in. All from a fictional character.

The characters in my e-novels are not as bright as Sherlock Holmes, but you may enjoy them anyway.

http://www.amazon.com/Terry-Nelson/e/B00EEVHN38

 

 

 

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