why e-book errors are here to stay

The sentence below is an excerpt from a best selling author’s e-book. I will not, of course, out of respect, list his name. The scene has a woman in a car and a male approaching the car who has exposed himself, thus the term yanking.

“It seemed so absurd that she started to laugh, but she thought better of it as he strode up the door other car and began yanking in her direction.”

An obvious mistake here. Does the author mean the ‘other car door’ or does he mean ‘door of her car.’ It makes a bit more sense that ‘other’ should be ‘of her’ but of course that is my thinking.

I do not know if the author did the formatting, or his agent, or an agent’s assistant, or if it came from the publisher. No matter, because a proofreader missed it, and the author should have proofread. For all I know he may have and missed it. I found another error, but it is not my intent to point out everything I may find, but to indicate that errors are going to be found in e-books. And we must live with them.

Proofreading, especially by the author, is far more time consuming than the actual writing. In my case with my latest novel,  “Silent Murder” which is by no means an exception, I proofread in Word.doc six times, then sent the file to my formatter and once it was converted to Amazon friendly Kindle, I checked through my Kindle app and found more errors; usually a missing period or quotation mark, or ‘ instead of ” and so on. In the Kindle I went through another six readings, finding errors I never saw before. What? Where did this come from? How did I not notice?

It is brutal. There are digital gremlins. I am sure of it.

The point being in one of my reviews of an earlier book the reviewer mentioned a few grammatical errors, but they did not interfere with his or her enjoyment of the story. It still bothers me that the book has a few errors. But the author reaches the point when he/she has gone through the readings so many times, with time off in between to clear your mind, that one must let it go to keep what sanity you have left.

So I apologize to anyone who finds a mistake along the way. I did my best, but we live in a new world of story telling, and if best selling authors can publish e-books with mistakes and grammatical errors, then we must forgive. I wish we could all write perfect books, but readers and proofreaders who read a book before publication, along with the author, and those insidious digital gremlins, will miss something.

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2 Comments

Filed under dalies, e-book publishing, e-books, fiction, fiction writing, indie writers, self publishing, writers, writing

2 responses to “why e-book errors are here to stay

  1. Ooohhh, nasty digie gremlins!! Fortunately, my w.i.p. hasn’t gotten that far!! At this point, in it, I’m stuck, with writer’s block–eerrgghh!

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  2. I’m pretty obsessive about my proofreading. I proofread every paragraph after I finish writing it. I do the same with every passage, every page, every scene, every chapter, every sequence of chapters, etc. Then I print the damn thing and STILL find more mistakes. But I still have more professional writing than the average internet writer because I actually push myself to proofread, which most people on the ‘net — especially internet fiction writers — don’t even bother doing, and I’m as proud of that as I am sad for the lazy writers I review.

    But pro writers have had typographical mistakes in their published works for years, even decades, and it could be the fault of the author or the publisher’s copywriter. I think ultimately if the mistake doesn’t change the meaning of a passage to the point of confusion, it’s probably okay that it was missed.

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